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Pentagon spending getting out of hand →

Audit: Air Force Didn't Justify Reaper Fleet Size →

U.S. Army Paid Too Much Upgrading Russian Copters: Audit →

The Pentagon Overpays for Almost Everything—Even Prescription Drugs →

“The F-35 “will be too small to serve as an effective bomber, not maneuverable enough for aerial dogfights and too fast and vulnerable to do well at supporting troops on the ground.””

William Hartung of the Center for International Policy in a new editorial from the New York Times about the problems plaguing the F-35.

Read more.

“Magic Helmet” for F-35 ready for delivery →

A $398 billion project for 2,443 F-35s (that’s the cost for the initial purchase; upkeep could run over a trillion dollars) that don’t actually work can be officially called a boondoggle. So why is Congress still committed to the F-35?

The answer lies with Lockheed Martin’s suave contracting strategy. What the company has done is incorporate subcontractors all over America (across forty-five states, in fact) into the process of manufacturing the F-35, keeping Congress more invested in funneling tax payer dollars to certain favored constituents than in offering said taxpayers a functioning plane. As former Pentagon acquisitions official Thomas Christie told Foreign Policy earlier this month, “An upfront question with any program is: How many congressional districts is it in?”

The F-35 is in being built in a lot of congressional districts. Which explains why the dysfunctional plane has its own caucus in Congress, creatively named the Joint Strike Fighter Caucus.

Boondoggles like these are more than just examples of Congressional incompetence, or even of corporate greed. They illustrate something very fundamental about how our government works: its primary function, at this point, is to funnel public money to corporations. As the last thirty years of America’s economic history as shown us, this grand transaction doesn’t necessarily equate to more jobs or rising salaries or a stronger middle class.

And unfortunately, in this instance, it doesn’t even mean that we get what we paid for.

C-27A Shining Example of the Billions Wasted in Afghanistan →

Pierre Sprey, designer of F-16, F-15, and A-10 talks about the failure of the F-35

Read more about the F-35.

New Afghan War Plan Announced, But How Much Will It Cost? →