"budget"

New Afghan War Plan Announced, But How Much Will It Cost? →

Long-delayed Homeland Security headquarters in doubt →

$1.5 billion over budget

Tell Congress to Save $7 Billion by Retiring the USS George Washington →

Here’s a pop quiz: How many aircraft carriers does the U.S. Navy need to maintain military superiority? Before you answer that question, consider that no other country in the world, including China and Russia, has more than two carriers.

Would five aircraft carriers be enough? How about seven or eight?

The fact is, the U.S. has ten nuclear powered carriers in its fleet, with another scheduled to become operational in a mere two years. However, carriers are incredibly expensive to maintain and top military strategists have raised serious doubts about their vulnerabilities in modern warfare. So, considering all those factors, does it make sense for the Navy to spend $4.7 billion next year to refuel the USS George Washington?

Thoughtful naval experts think the Pentagon could easily trim its budget by reducing its carrier fleet, while still maintaining a Navy second to none. We agree.

Tell Congress to Save $7 Billion by Retiring the USS George Washington

Report: Pentagon to destroy $1B in ammo →

The Pentagon may destroy millions of dollars worth of usable ammunition because its inventory systems can’t talk to each other. In order to run an efficient and effective military, the Pentagon has got to get serious about making data sharable between various computer systems for things like ammunition and health records.

Military Gives Congress a $36 Billion Wish List →

What would you do with $36 billion?

Retiring the Air Force's star player is a mistake, A-10 supporters say →

If you thought the days of the $7,000 coffee machine and $640 toilet seat were over, Rep. Jackie Speier has some more examples of egregious waste at the Department of Defense.

When Congress is deciding how to spend more than half a trillion dollars of the taxpayers money, it needs to do so in public. It is deeply troubling that the Pentagon’s budget (the National Defense Authorization Act or NDAA) that last year authorized more than $625 billion in spending—is drafted and voted on by the Senate Armed Services Committee almost entirely in secret.

The bill—usually more than 1,000 pages long—is often then voted on with little or no chance for public debate and amendments by the full Senate.

The public has a right to know how Congress is conducting the people’s business, particularly when so many taxpayer dollars and important wide-ranging policies are at stake.

It’s time to bring the Senate NDAA into the light of day.

Sign the petition!

utnereader:

The Pentagon’s Phony Budget War
The DoD cuts that didn’t actually happen. 

(via silas216)